Reconsidering Modern Art Theory: Reading Richard Shiff’s “Digital Experience in Modern Art”

(article en anglais puis japonais)

Takanori Nagaï

(Article paru dans Memoirs of the Faculty of Engineering and Design, Kyoto Institute of Technology, JINBUN, vol. 51, 2002, pp. 67-76, précédant l’article de Richard Shiff : « Digital Experience in Modern Art »)

Preface

Richard Shiff’s “Digital Experience in Modern Art” first appeared in Les Cahiers(No. 66, Winter 1998) as the text of a lecture he delivered in Paris[1]Richard Shiff, L’expérience digitale – Une problématique de la peinture moderne, dans Les Cahiers,Nr. 66, Hiver 1998, pp. 51-77.. Later, he was invited to Japan by the Japan Foundation and delivered a similar talk at the Kyoto Institute of Technology on September 22, 2001The text I refer to below is a different version that was rewritten for a Japanese audience.

Along with the Japanese translation, I have included a series of related notes on the topic.

In short, Shiff’s text is a theory of modern art for the post-post-modern era. In it, he touches on several of the basic disputes related to modern art that have arisen between the end of WWII and today. To a few of Shiff’s main points, I have supplemented my own comments, tried to place them in a context and attempted to provide additional thoughts on modern art theory.

The Hand and the Machine

Is the act of creation something to be performed with the hand or with the machine? This  is an extremely important issue that arose in art following the emergence of post-industrial Revolution design and the invention of the camera. It is no exaggeration to say that the ideological conflict of the 20th century has been the alternating assertion that either negated mechanical production and favored the manual or negated manual production and favored the mechanical.

Shiff sets out to reevaluate the place of “the hand” in modern art, or more precisely, “the digits” (fingers) in the digital experience. The importance of the hand in art and design has been extensively argued by the 19th-century designer William Morris, Henri Focillon in the 20th century and has continued to be championed by critics and art historians in this century. On the other hand, a number of arguments against it have also been put forward.

Shift’s own argument is in itself not a new one, but rather aims to revive several of the more criticized points of the theory. Why exactly has he decided to take up the topic now? Before answering that question, it is first necessary to review the major aesthetic positions regarding the hand and the machine.

In 1955, Henri Focillon discussed the role of “the hand” in art in a chapter entitled “The Praise of the Hand” in his book Vies des Formes(The Life of Forms in Art). On the making of art, Focillon states that the creativity of the fingers and the hand leads to a synthesis of all of the senses, in particular feeling, thinking with the entire body, a heightened awareness and a reworking of an artist’s materials. According to Focillon, the praise of the hand is based on French vitalist thought of the late 19th century. In one sense, the idea was meant to act as an anti-thesis against academic art, photography and the mechanical age and to advance the notion of the special privileges of art. In Focillon’s words:

As soon as he attempts to intervene in the agenda to which he is subject, he begins to thrust a spear into an opaque nature— with a blade that gives him shape, the primitive industry holds in itself all of its future development. The resident of the cave, who sharpens flint arrowheads with tiny, careful sparks and makes needles from bones, surprises me much more than the erudite manufacturer of machines[2]Henri Focillon, Éloge de la main, dans Vie des formes,1943, Paris, 8eédition, Presses Universitaires de France, p. 110..

The artist who cuts his wood, forges his metal, kneads his clay and carves his block of stone conveys to us the past of ancient man, without whom we would not exist. Wonderful, isn’t it, to see the rise, in this machine age, of this dogged survivor from the age of manual labor [3]Henri Focillon, ibid.,p. 115.?

In response, in 1956, Pierre Francastel questioned the significance of traditional criticism regarding mechanical production. In considering technological innovations and artistic revolutions based on tools and machines to be a field of academic research that supersedes the borders of aesthetics and art history, he attempts to decipher the change in sensibilities in modern art that emerged out of the mechanical age. The analysis provides a wealth of suggestions that are just as applicable to the present day[4]Pierre Francastel, Art et technique aux XIXe et XX siècle – La genèse des formes modernes, Paris, Éditions Denoël, 1956.

In 1970, in his book, Clefs pour I’Esthétique[5]Etienne Souriau, L’Art et la machine, dans Clefs pour l’Esthetique,Éditions Seghers, Paris, 1970, pp. 152-167.the French aesthetician Etienne Souriau deals with the hand in art and the problem of the machine without specifically naming Focillon. Criticizing the praise of the hand that followed Morris, he points out the necessity of mechanization in art, or more precisely, the mechanical opportunity which is inherent in creation. In this way, Souriau demonstrates that the aesthetics which had been used to support modern art since romanticism have been biased both in the present (1970) and in the past.

As is widely known, with the drift away from manual production, the theory that authorized artistry through mechanical production came to be an important subject in modern design. The theory became a reality with the advent of Purism, Russian constructivism, De Stijl, Bauhaus and post-WWll product design. This process was made perfectly clear by Reyner Banham[6]Reyner Banham, Theory and Design in the First Machine Age,London, 1960.. The value in traces of the hand or the marks of great labor (that is, the ethical value that these are presumably based on), was erased from the design industry. Design, a field indivisible from technological innovation, had undergone a clear shift away from art that was the work of the hand toward the concepts of the head.

Similarly, in modern art, a field that is indivisible from developments in modern design, through the rules and geometry of tools and machines, the chance events of manual work were eliminated. Artists began to pursue an aesthetic value that was difficult to realize through manual techniques, leading eventually to a rise in abstract art. Art differs from design in that it is a creative act that is not regulated by a specific set of realistic conditions. Today, in light of various innovations in scientific technology, it has become increasingly difficult to deny the effect on the technical side of art. Without picking up a chisel, sculptors can sketch out a plan, select the materials and place an order with an iron foundry to produce a work. In the same way, without a single finger every touching a keyboard or the strings of a musical instrument, music can be created simply by programming a computer. Without ever applying a brush to paint or a canvas, readymade pictures can be produced at will using a computer and other such devices. Furthermore, with the emergence of media art that employs combinations of sounds and other techniques, “modern art theory based on the praise of the hand,” which evolved to establish a firm foundation for art following the handpraising tenets of romanticism and the invention of the reproductive device called the camera, began to look very old indeed[7]For a useful perspective on media art, please refer to Yoshizumi Takeshi’s Media Jidai no Geijutu: Geijutu to Nichijo no Hazama (Art in the Media Age: Between Art and Daily Life), Keiso Publishing, 1992 (in Japanese).. As with design, it appeared as though art had found a new dwelling divorced from physical labor and inseparable from the world of ideas and concepts resident in the head.

In the 80s, Rosalind Krauss[8]Rosalind E. Krauss, The Originality of the Avant-Garde, The Originality of the Avant-Garde and other Modernist Myths,The MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1985, pp. 151-170. tried to drive another nail in the coffin of modern art. Krauss argued that “originality,” an essential part of manual labor in traditional modern art theory, was in fact a myth, and that conversely, modern art was also based on the principles of reproduction, duplication and repetition, and that, at the core of modern art lay a system based on the statements of art historians and museum exhibitions that defended originality and suppressed the principles of reproduction and duplication as being anti-original.

Behind Krauss’s assertions stood the art that had begun with pop artists such as Andy Warhol who had started their careers as designers and introduced long-running design principles (repetition, the use of readymade forms, borrowing, quotation, etc.) to the field of art. More importantly, there is no doubt that this had a great effect on the development of post-modern design as a reassessment of the old modern art theory through post-modern art theory.

On the other hand, though he doesn’t court controversy by outwardly criticizing Krauss, in another essay[9]Richard Shiff, Originality, in Critical Terms for Art History,The University of Chicago Press, 1996, pp. 103-115., Shiff carefully scrutinizes the notion of originality and suggests that even in post-modern art, it has not been extinguished, but rather that originality has survived by changing its form within this altered network. In Shift’s “Digital Experience in Modern Art,” he discovers examples of the existence of originality in the form of the free-hand drawing and playful nature of the brushwork of Seurat (who among 19th century artists was excluded from post-romantic modern art theory because of his mechanical technique, but was later rescued by 20th century mechanical aesthetic positions such as purism) and the mechanical repetition of impersonal structural units seen in Warhol and Roy Lichtenstein.

Meyer Shapiro made an analogy between Seurat’s paintings and production by engineers that were developed at the time[10]Meyer Schapiro, New Light on Seurat, in Art News,LVII, April, 1958, pp. 23-24, 44-45, 52., but Shiff offers an unspoken criticism of Shapiro’s view on Seurat. Further, in his analysis of Warhol and other pop artists, Shiff uses modern art theory to suggest an alternative reading of post-pop art which seems to transcend modern art due to the introduction of design principles. This view serves as a counterattack against post-modern art theory by way of modern art theory.

What exactly is the logic behind this attack? For one thing, to borrow an expression from Banham, it is clear that we are yearning to rush into “The Second Mechanical Age: The Age of Electronic Technology.” The American soldiers who fought in the Persian Gulf War in the 1990s, accomplished their attacks through the use of a computer, which it is said appeared very much like a game on the screen. In this process, the fundamental relationship between touching and feeling has ceased without a direct connection between the touch of a finger and the act of destruction. As the actual feeling of destruction was lost, the act became a virtual experience. To express this in (Marshall) McLuhaneseque terms[11]Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man,The MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., London, 1964, pp. 338-345., the more weapons, which by rights should be an extension of our hands and legs, and teeth, have been transformed through the development of thought in the central nervous system, the less they seem to be connected to the body. Or to give another example, it is essential that at least for those people directly involved in producing visual images with a computer or film equipment that can be controlled by a finger and guided by vision. In this, along with physical labor, there is a concomitant sense of mental development that arises. Yet the result of moving one’s finger has clearly lost the immediacy it once had with paints and canvas, strings and keyboards. The situation that has arisen out of the electronic age is one in which, even more than the first mechanical age, a huge distance lies between the body and the effect.

Yet, as to how the electronic age will proceed in the future and whether the distance will increase or otherwise altered, since we are forever fated to be nothing more than a single living organism, there will be no change in the fact that human beings will continue to live by adjusting the balance between mind and body and yearning for direct contact with the environment through our five senses. This being the case, the value lies in the fact that Shiff has dared to support works not only as a form of resistance against the act of systematizing human beings as if they were machines, but also to suggest that the practice of modern art is one of “the most fundamental daily activities to recover human scale and feeling.” As it is still highly effective, does this in fact explain why it has resurfaced along with advances into the second mechanical age?

At a symposium to celebrate the opening of a Cézanne exhibition at the Orsay Museum in 1995, Shiff concluded his remarks with the following words on the painter’s contemporary significance:

Artists who do such things assume special meaning within a society that worries over the influence of technologies, the simulation of identities, and the loss of sensory and bodily integrity — a society anxious over its increasing alienation from nature and from organic physicality. The case of Cézanne inspires not only thinking and theorizing on this issue, but perhaps also some attempt at immediate action- an attempt at making[12]Richard Shiff, La touche de Cézanne: entre vision impressionniste et vision symboliste, Cézanne aujourd’hui (Actes de colloque organisé par le musée d’Orsay, 29 et 30 novembre 1995), Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris, 1997, p. 124. (I would like to express my gratitude to Shiff for providing me with the English text I have quoted here.) .

Today, modern art has come to occupy a classical position in Western art history. This has resulted in a reductive movement to treat modern art as a thing of the past, and without any hint of appreciation or experience, modern art has merely become a subject of positivist research to be dealt with in a monotonous amassing of factual content disguised as academic pursuit. But according to Shiff, less than 200 years since its birth, modern art is by no means over. His statement regarding the contemporary significance of modern art as something that continues to live on in the present day is of great value.

Seeing and Feeling

The preference given to the hand over the machine contains an interest in the sense of touch in modern art. Above all, the sense of touch is important in the contact made with the brush and the canvas which results in the physicality of the paint as the picture takes shape. Further, innovations involving touch are one of the most important aspects in modern art. In this sense, the paragonethat sculpture is the province of touch and painting the province of vision no longer holds true.

The artistic method of not first assembling a closed form, deciding the structure and space, and adding color, but simultaneously determining the color, shape, space and structure through brush touch and small units of paint was naturally not an invention of modern art. There are, however, numerous styles cited as the origin of modern art, including the Venice School, Dutch painting of the 17th century, rococo art and the Barbizon School, so many in fact that tracing them has become one of the traditions in Western art history. With the rise of the French neoclassicist aesthetic, brush touch vanished, but later made a comeback with romanticism, resulting in the emergence of ideological issues related to the two methods in traditional painting.

It is impossible to deal comprehensively with all the writings on brush touch in French books on technique, art theory, criticism and aesthetics by people such as André Félibian, Roger de Pile, Jean-Etienne Liotard, Charles Blanc and Eugène Véron. Suffice to say that critics who prized early modern art in the era in which it was being made focused on the appearance and effects of brush touch and paint specks, and the buildup of paint on the canvas. Among these critics were Charles Baudelaire, on Eugène Delacroix and Émile Zola, on Edouard Manet.

As Philippe Junod has accurately stated in his extensive surveys and analyses of 19th century critics’ word choice in their writings on modern art[13]Philippe Junod, Transparence et Opaciée – Essai sur les fondements théorique del’art moderne pour une nouvelle lecture de Konrad Fiedler,Éditions L’Âge d’homme, Lausanne, 1975., the peculiarity of modern art lay in the transition from scenes viewed through a transparent window, which had existed since the Renaissance, to scenes in which this transparency from the past coexists with an opacity created by the paint’s materiality. The antagonism between a representation that negated materiality and a materiality that negated representation gave modern art its distinct character. Descriptions and analyses of this materiality continued on in the modern art theories of Henri Focillon and Hubert Damisch, etc[14]Hubert Damisch, Les dessous de la peinture, Fenêtre jaune cadmium ou les dessous de la peinture, Paris,Éditionsdu Seuil, 1984, pp. 11-46; Henri Focillon, Manuels d’histoire de l’art. La peinture aux XIXe et XX siècles du Réalisme à nos jours,Paris Librairie Renouard-H. Laurens, Éditeur, 1928; T. Nagaï, Matiérisme/Modernité— Le phénomène de symbiose des techniques du dessin et de la peinture au XIXe siècle, in AestheticNr. 177, 1994 Summer, pp. 42-52 (text in Japanese), p. 79 (summary in French)..

In another paper on Cézanne, Shiff once again deals with the obvious problems in French criticism and art history perspectives and the special character of modern art as seen in Junod’s linguistic analysis[15]Richard Shiff, Cézanne’s Physicality: The Politics of Touch, in The Language of Art History, edited by Salim Kemal and Ivan Gaskell, Cambridge University Press, 1991, pp. 129-180.. Why?

The reason seems to be related to the preponderance of visual theories in recent years, in which one group of art historians have tended to make special concessions to the visual element in 19th century modern art. Shiff see things differently and takes the other side of the argument.

As McLuhan pointed out, the culture of the printed word gave precedence to vision over all other functions of the various human organs. The technological innovations of the modern era have led us outside of the Gutenberg Galaxy. It is obvious that to keep up with these developments, it was the intention of 19th century modern art to restore feeling and hearing[16]Marshall McLuhan, The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man,University of Toronto Press, 1962. Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man,The Mit Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, London, 1964, pp. 308-337. In this work, McLuhan pointed out that in the pictures of Cézanne, Seurat and Georges-Henri Rouault, which dismantle representational painting as products of the scientific laws of perspective giving priority to the visual, and consist of small units of paint on the canvas, there exists a mosaic-like construction, which acts as the basis for television and emphasizing the sense of touch. But in fact there is nothing that links the invention of television to the work of the three, and McLuhan did not make any mention about the differences in each of the painters’ brush-work. To explore the topic further, a more thorough study is needed..

The problem remains that the media which brought widespread popularity to modern art is limited to the visual when it comes to communications concerning modern art. The reason for this is the need for growth in the culture of reproduction with the visual as an intermediary.

Art appreciation through books of paintings and exhibition catalogues, explanations of artworks using slides in university lectures and museum talks, and the introduction of art through television and video imagery took away the materiality of the modern art. In addition, museums exhibit even those works of sculpture, industrial art or design that should have functioned to stimulate the entire body, including the sense of touch, as something that is merely visual. Feeling the weight of a painting, touching the surface of the canvas and smelling the aroma of the paint are actions that are forbidden to the general viewer and restricted only to special individuals such as the owner, the curator and the restorer of art. As a result, a situation arises in which the fact that the painting consists of materials recedes or is concealed, creating an awareness only as a purely retinal image.

In this context, these two aspects of modern art, the image and the materiality, must be repeatedly identified by the viewer. This point in Shift’s argument is of particular significance.

Academism and the Avant-Garde

The 1980s were filled with criticism of art history, primarily modern art. It is fresh in our memory that questions had been leveled at the antagonistic relationship between modern art and academism. Already, in the 1970s, Albert Boime[17]Albert Boime, The Academy & French Painting in the 19th CenturyNew Haven and London, 1971. had proposed that the origins of modern art could be found in academic sketching techniques, calling attention to what he saw as the compromised style of both parties. Bruno Foucart[18]Bruno Foucart, Les Salons et l’innovation picturale au XIXe siècle, dans le Catalogue d’exposition. La tradition et l’innovation dans l’art francais par les peintres des salons,1989, The National Museum of Modern Art Kyoto, pp. 15-18. portrayed the 19th century art world as being a quarrel between tradition and innovation, with tradition constantly giving way to innovation in the avant-garde. Both writers protested against purism in modern art history, which dealt with modern art in isolation.

With the opening of the Orsay Museum in 1986 came a revival of the salon and academic painters, who were shown in the same spaces as avant-garde painters of the past. Thus, they tried to reconstruct the site of the birth of modern art. In addition, many exhibitions of the salon and academic painters were held, research dealing with them went forward and the previous historical perspective that centered on modern art was revised. It was in the 1980s that so-called revisionist or post-modernist art history started to cause controversy.

Looking back on that period, some 20 years later, the motive seems to have been rooted both in restoring French classicism along with a resurgence of French ideology, as has happened time and again in history, as well as influencing the art market; i.e., the speculative value of academic painting, which had previously been relegated to a corner of the storage with the rise of modern art, was discovered.

However, as Jean-Claude Lebensztejn sounded the alarm upon the initial appearance of post-modernist art history[19]Jean-Claude Lebensztejn, Deuxième puissance, CritiqueNr. 454, 1985, pp. 225-248., many facts concerning academic art may have been revealed, but it still must be admitted that up until the present day academic art has never been found to rival modern art in terms of artistic value.

There is after all a huge gap between academic artists like William Bouguereau and Alexandre Cabanel who imitated the precise reproductive ability of the photograph and modern artists like Cezanne, Pierre-Auguste Renoir and Claude Monet, who dispensed with the mechanical reproductions of the camera and post-Renaissance representational techniques. Wasn’t it in fact post-modernist art history and the museum exhibitions that were organized as a result of it that gave people a clear awareness of the differences between the two?

Since the demise of post-modernist art history, Shiff has once again pointed out the gap between the two groups. Cézanne’s worry that his work could not be completed was related to the “gap” between his feelings and “the cultural construction that provided a context for his work.” (Shiff) In other words, this concern arose out of the “gap” between the traditional, classical vision, technique, and the vision and technique of Cézanne. Further, the “gap” — born out of the drawbacks and limitations of the paint medium — that lies between the things Cézanne sees and feels and the things that are realized on the canvas is the very thing that indicates Cézanne’s uneasiness and evolved into his unique theory of incompletion. Yet, by using Cézanne’s era as a cultural standard, Shiff is in no way saying that Cézanne’s way of leaving what he has painted is a mark of incompletion. Cézanne was responsible for creating an entirely new standard, but as he lamented in his later years, it was never recognized as such[20]Lettre à un jeune artiste (ami de Joachim Gasquet) (Gustave Heiries?), dans Cézanne – Correspondance,éditée par John Rewald, Nouvelle édition complète et définitive, Paris, Bernard Grasset, 1978, p. 256..

Modern Art and Society

Attempts to interpret modern art in a contemporaneous social context were proposed by Meyer Schapiro, whose ideas were further developed by T. J. Clark and Robert Herbert[21]Meyer Schapiro, The Nature of Abstract Art, Marxist QuarterlyJanuary-March, 1937, pp. 77-98 ; Impressionism-Reflections and PerceptionsGeorge Braziller, New York, 1997; T. J. Clark, The Painting of Modern Life Parisien Art of Manet and His FollowersLondon, 1984; Robert Herbert, Impressionism Art, Leisure, and Parisien SocietyNew Haven and London, 1988; Robert Herbert L. and Eugenia W. Herbert, Artists and Anarchism: Unpublished Letters of Pissarro, Signac and others-I, II, Burlington MagazineVol. CII, Nr. 692, 693, November, December, 1960, pp. 473-481, pp. 517-522; Françoise Cachin, The Néo-Impressionist Avant-Garde, in Art News annualNo. 4, 1968, pp. 55-66, etc.. The attempt to understand modern art as a social product rather than a problem of pure forms and systems has been foregrounded in today’s circumstance in which formalist criticism and modernist history have been relativized as products of history and culture. In addition, since modern artists also lived and worked in a certain era and society, we can certainly no longer ignore these problems regarding the lineage of modern art theory.

Needless to say, however, a certain kind of iconography, which points out that objects like a new landscape and mechanical products that evolved out of technological innovations and urban development following the Industrial Revolution are depicted in modern art, is inadequate as the sociological approach. The same is true with regard to the perspective that sees the projection of social structure and the interpretation of an artist’s society in the way that subjects are depicted in the paintings.

Regarding this, one French art historian, Pierre Francastel, embarked on a sociological study of modern art quite early on[22]See Note 4., but his work came to an end when leading students such as Hubert Damisch failed to carry on the effort, stating that Francastel’s argument was lacking in rigor and divergent.

Francastel discovered that revolutionary use of space held the key to unlocking the sociological meaning of modern art. He tried to see a certain relationship between modern art and society in its formal aspect. Shift’s focus is also on the abstraction and autonomy rather than the iconography as Francastel’s theory. In this way, Shiff makes a unique contribution to the issue.

In Shift’s theory on Cézanne[23]Richard Shiff, Sensation, Movement, Cezanne, Classic Cézanne (exhibition catalogue), The Art Gallery of New South Wales, 1998, p. 22; Mark, Motif, Materiality — The Cézanne Effect in the Twentieth Century, in Finished Unfinished Cézanne (exhibition catalogue), Kunstforum Wien, 2000, pp. 106-107, 117-120; Introduction to Conversation with Cézanne, edited by Michael Doran, University of California Press, Berkeley/Los Angeles/London, 2001, pp. xxxi-xxxiv., of the two aspects that make up Cézanne’s pictures — rep­resentation and materiality — he prefers the latter, stating that it reveals the painter’s spirituality. This is also exactly the place where one finds Cézanne’s resistance to materialism, which was rooted in the growing commodification and standardization that came with the Industrial Revolution. If “The art of the painter is all the more intimate in the hearts of man because it looks more tangible[24]Eugène Delacroix, Journal 1822-1863, Préface de Hubert Damisch, Introduction et notes par André Joubin, Éditions Plon, Paris, 1982 (Mardi 8 Octobre 1922), p. 29., then modern art, which emerged and was developed along with advances in modernization, can be seen from the outset to include a critical stance toward the same era through artistic creation, whether it worships or negates the product of modernization. And isn’t this exactly what Shiff is trying to reclaim as the contemporary significance of modern art ?

Conclusion

In a word, Shift’s theory of modern art is of a piece with French formalism. However, it is by no means an attempt to consciously go beyond American formalism and quote French thought in the context of American art history to be fashionable. From the beginning of his academic career, Shiff, while analyzing 19th century criticism and reviving the context of modernart thought and philosophy, has established his own unique method of interpreting modern art over many years.

Thus, it is inevitable that he has assumed the language of French art history and criticism. Although as long as Shiff is living in a certain era and society as an interpreter, his viewpoint seems on the one hand to share something with the magnetic field of statements that gave value to the formation of post-war art in America.

If we limit our scope to his research on Cézanne, Shift’s method is an attempt to stand clear of the psychoanalytical interpretations developed chiefly in the U.S. beginning in the 1960s following Schapiro and Reff that have continued on into the present[25]See the researches by Meyer Schapiro, Theodore Reff, Geist and others, as mentioned in the Isabelle Cahn’s bibliography in Cézanne (Catalogue d’exposition)Galeries nationales du Grand Palais, 1996 ; Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris, 1996, pp. 581-587.. Concentrating on representational elements in Cézanne, the psychoanalytic viewpoint ignored the materiality in the paintings and preferred to grasp the imagery, which has continued to result in the production of a whole host of “Cézanne stories.” To borrow Rosalind Krauss’s phrase, this could be thought of as an example of the “paraliterary”[26]Rosalind Krauss, Poststructuralism and the Paraliterary, in op. cit.pp. 291-296.), but isn’t it necessary at this point for psychoanalytical interpretations to be psychoanalysed?

It is my belief that Shiff’s modern art theory, whether in regard to the French element (in his continuing belief in the special privilege of modern art in contrast academic painting) or to the American (in his continuing view of modern art not as the site of logic and excessive meaning but as the site of experience), indicates a new direction in an era following the demise of post-modern art history and the lack of appearance of a salient modern art theory.

 

 

近代芸術におけるデジタル体験

 

リチャード・シフ

テキサス大学教授・モダニズム研究センター所長

1906年9月、自らの死期が近づくのを感じたポール・セザンヌは、エミール・ベルナールに宛てた書簡で次のように語った。「私はあれほど長い間追い続けてきたあの目標に達するでしょうか。[中略]私は常に自然に基づいて仕事をしています。そして、ゆっくりと進歩を遂げているように思います。」1)

この言葉は、悲哀を誘うと同時に皮肉のようにも聞こえる。百年後の我々の目で見るとセザンヌは、絵画においてすでに驚くべき成果を勝ち取っていたように見えるからだ。仮にセザンヌの死が二十年早く訪れていたとしても、つまりサント・ヴィクトワール山を題材とした1880年代の風景画を描いても、晩年のより濃密な風景画を描くことのないまま命を終えていたとしても、我々はやはりセザンヌに敬服していることだろう。セザンヌの決意は並外れて強靭であったので、最終的に彼がある程度まで自然の姿を写し取れるようにならなかったとしたら不思議である。というのも、それこそ、セザンヌが常に目指していたことだったからである。しかし、セザンヌの方法は、絵の具という媒体を用いた、物質的な方法だった。そして物質性は、表象の妨げになる。というのも物質性は、人が表象できることを制限し、場合によっては人が想像できることさえも制限するからである。セザンヌの死から二年後、新印象主義の画家アンリ=エドモン・クロスは覚書の中で、次のように述べている。「(物質的)素材は、ある種の思考を許容するが、別の思考は許容しない。[中略]意識は、素材が許容するものに制限される。」2)これこそが、セザンヌの不安の原因であった。セザンヌの直面していた問題は、彼自身の精神または視覚の欠陥にあったのではなく、絵の具(という素材)にあったのであり、そのことに本人が気付くことがあったかどうかはともかく、彼は素材に固有の技術的な限界に阻まれて、その明白な目標に到達することができなかったのである。

絵画におけるリアリズムを追い求めたセザンヌの断続的な闘いは有名であるが、それはデジタル・コンピュータの利用の現状とも関係がある。近代美術における課題のいくつかを表すのに、「デジタル」という言葉が相応しいのはそのためである。英語の「デジタル」には、「指や手に関する」という意味があり、従って手先を用いた技術(Craft)とも関係する。また同時に、計算やイメージをグリッド状にマッピングすることも指す。「デジタル」という言葉は、絵画制作に特徴的な、イメージを一筆単位、あるいは1ビット単位で構成して行く過程を表している。画家はキャンバスに無制限の筆跡を加えることができるが、一つ一つの筆跡を加えるには時間がかかるし、そのあり方に物理的な制限が存在することもある。そこで我々は、コンピュータの利用を考えるのである。コンピュータは、情報を処理することによって、絵画という方法を用いようと数学的な方法を用いようと、高度な形で自然を表象する。しかし、ここでも素材による限界は存在する。小型化が進む中、その要請に適う新しい素材が開発できなければ、我々は、メモリーチップに十億ビット、あるいは1兆ビットもの情報を入れるだけの容量を求める現在の理論モデルを放棄しなくてはならないだろう。もし、ビットというものが、オン・オフ出来るようなスイッチであるならば、その数は限りなく増やすことができ、その配置も変更可能だろう(まるで絵の具による筆跡のように)。しかし、実際に製造可能な機器には何ビット入るかという問題がある。従って、スイッチがどのような素材で作られているのか、つまり、その物理的な形や材質が問題になるのである。セザンヌが自分自身の芸術の中で問題と感じていたことの一つは、それが目で見た自然に十分に近づいていないという事であった。だからこそ、彼は筆触を何度も重ね続けたのである。

一般的な言い方をするならば、セザンヌは見ることと作ることとの間にある現象上の違い、つまり、遠い風景を見ることと、手に握りしめた絵筆を動かすのとの違いに直面していたのである。画家はその技巧によって、一定の大きさと一定のニュアンスを持った筆跡を残す。画家は絵の具で描くことによって、利用可能な素材や道具であらゆる視覚効果を再現できるわけではないことに気付く。また、画家の技法によって生み出された効果すべてが、見たことのある何かに対応するわけでもない。というのも、表象はすぐにそれ独自の性質を帯びるようになるからだ。問題は必ずしも画家の主観性と彼をとりまく自然の事実との対立にあるとは限らない。問題は、画家自身の身体の各器官の機能にあることもある。手は目によって観察された束の間の光や色を再現しようと努めるが、その方法は特有の身体性を持っている。まるで目と手が、それぞれ特有の性質や素質を持った別々の媒体を通じて作業しているかのようである。

セザンヌの絵画には、画家の手やそのリズムが優勢になるようなものが数多く存在するように思われる。この点が最も明らかなのは、平行して斜めに並べられた筆跡の見られる、比較的広々とした風景画である。より抑制された作品、例えば何点かの小さな、親密な雰囲気の人物画においても、同じ現象を見ることができるかもしれない。1883年から1885年頃に描かれた息子の絵(パリ、オランジュリー美術館所蔵)では、セザンヌは楕円型を重ねることで、少年の頭のてっぺん、肩の丸み、丸い襟ぐり、隣の椅子の背もたれ、そしてより細かい点では、弓形の眉や耳、あごの輪郭さえも描き出した。その際、セザンヌは自らの「感覚」を引き出すために、少年の顔つきを観察することと同じくらい、描くという身体の動きに頼っていた。そのような運動や楕円形をなぞる動きによって形作られた視覚上のモチーフは、キャンバスにのせられる絵の具という媒体そのものの中から生まれたのだと言えるだろう。それは、少年の存在をきっかけとしていたかもしれないが、その少年の持つ特定の要素に依存しているわけではない。

セザンヌは、自らの手による自然の物理的再現、つまり彼の絵画制作上の技法が生み出した成果と、彼の作品にコンテクストを与え、自然がどのように感じられるかではなくどのように見えるべきかを示唆する文化的な構成とが、一致しなかったことにあると考えていたと言えるだろう。セザンヌは、自分が規則的に風景画を仕上げていくことで、あるいは息子の顔や隣にある椅子の曲線が絵を支配するようになったことで生じた結果に、満足していたのかもしれない。しかし、それでもまだ自然を捉えきれないでいると感じていたようである。セザンヌが生きている時代の文化が想定していた表象の規範は、画家自らが感じたもの――セザンヌの言葉でいえばその「感覚」――を通じて展開されていく、セザンヌの絵画的実践に、何故か不適切なものであった。

今日我々が、セザンヌの絵画における成功を当然の事実と考えるのは、物質的構成というものについて、セザンヌと異なる理解を持っているからだろうか。その違い自体、セザンヌのおかげで初めて意識されるようになったのかもしれない。だが、それでも疑問が残る。何故、セザンヌは自分自身、その違いを意識することができなかったのだろうか。何故、自分の描き方は正しかったという結論に達しなかったのだろうか。何故、彼は、自分が大きく進歩していることをなかなか信じることができず、エミール・ベルナールに宛てた手紙に見られるように、ゆっくりとしか進歩していないと思いこんでいたのだろうか。

この疑問に答えるために、以下いくつかの事例を取り上げ、考察を加える。それぞれの事例は、人間の手による表象との関連で想定される問題を示唆している。この数十年間に活躍した芸術家から事例を取り上げるが、彼らは、セザンヌの苦悩や葛藤をもはや共有していない。

*     *    *     *     *    *     *     *    *     *

非常によく見られる部類の表象としては、一般にコピーと呼ばれるものがある。コピーというのは(自由な解釈による模倣とは違い)、厳密に、事細かく、手本やオリジナルに対応していなければならない。3)コピーの良し悪しを見極める方法のひとつとしては、コピーをその手本に重ねて、見た目に差異や歪曲がないか確かめるというものがある。この「重ねる」という基準を満たすために、画家はしばしばトレーシングの道具を用いた。例えば、16世紀初頭にアルブレヒト・デユーラーが制作した絵からわかるように、オリジナルのイメージに簡単なグリッドを重ねたり、カメラ・ルシーダを用いて手本のイメージを別の面に投影し、それをトレースしたりすることが多かった。

創造的表象に過度に機械的なものが介入する危険性が現れるのは、芸術家が写真家となった19世紀においてである。初期の写真の推進者や写真用品の業者は、それをこの新しい媒体のセールスポイントとして宣伝した。つまり、写真の繊細で均質的な表面と精密な表現は、それと同じ効果を作り出すのに必要な、手先の器用さや実際に手を使って作業する忍耐力を持ち合わせていない人々にでさえ実現可能だったのである。もともとコピーという作業には決して適しているとは言えない手は、もはやその努力をする必要がなくなった。1844年に、先駆的な発明家ウイリアム・ヘンリー・フォックス・タルボットは言っている。写真は、「表象の真実味やリアリテイーを増大させるには役立つが、いかなる芸術家も自然から忠実にコピーする手間はかけないような、多数の細かいデイテールを増すことを可能にする。[中略](写真は)そのような手間をすべて省かせてくれる」。4)フォックス・タルボットの初期の写真は、大量の干し草の山とそれに立てかけてある簡素で直線的な梯子が、同じくらいリアリテイーを持って表象できることを証明している。では、技術の向上によって、絵画という古い媒体においても同じように手間のかからない手法が誕生するだろうか。

この問題は、1880年代にジョルジュ・スーラおよびその他の点描画家たちによって、ある程度まで解決された。規則的に、そして恐らく「科学的」に、点や色を加えていくという、この画法は、屋外の情景やアトリエ内の手本という視覚的な体験を再現するために編み出されたのである。イメージは、画家特有のものではなく、誰でも、たとえ経験に乏しい者でも、模倣しようとイメージを描くことは可能である。点描を用いれば、スーラの支持者、フェリックス・フェネオンが言うように、「手の技術(手先の器用さ)は、無視できるほどになる」。5)

従って、スーラの技法が真っ先に提示した困難は、それが誰にでもできるものに見える、ということだった。スーラの「点」はかなり変化に富んではいたが、当時の他の画家たちが用いる筆跡等と比べたら、没個性的な規則性を示していると見られてしまった。その規則性は、人間の手は常に独特の個性を表す、ということを否定するようであった。ロマン主義にしても印象派にしても、画家たちの中心的な課題のひとつは、個性や個人的な気質をいかに表現するか、という事であった。規則的に絵の具を置くというスーラの技法によって、芸術家たちはもはや個人的な特色を表すことがなくなり、セザンヌに見られるような苦悩に満ちた自己不信もなくなる。このマイナスの可能性がなくなるのであれば、プラスの可能性もなくなる。つまり、個人的な制作プロセスに関わる悦びが失われるのである。

ここには遊びもなければ悦びもない。それだけでも、スーラの絵にみられる機械的なものは見せかけの効果に過ぎず、一見無機質で機械的に見える作品も伝統的で有機的な方法で制作されたに違いない、と主張したくなる。手を使って制作する芸術家は、規則的な手順によって抑制されていても、創造的であり得るし、悦びや遊びをすべて放棄することはないだろう。作業が一種の肉体労働になるような場合でも、自らの技巧に悦びを見いださない人間は想像し難い。この悦びの要素は、人間の生活にとって自然な特徴であると考えられる。というのも、子どもが遊んでいる時には、そのような悦びを観察できると、誰もが思っているからである。6)子どもは、手を使ってものを作るのを楽しむようである。ちょうど大人が、その同じ単純な悦びを味わおうと、進んで手を使うこと――木の剪定から食事を作ることまで――に関わるのと同じである。「作業」は、オリジナルをもとに絵を描くという変化に富む場合もあれば、絵筆を洗うことのような反復的な場合もある。抽象表現主義者のウイレム・デ・クーニングは絵を描くことが好きだっただけではなく、その後の片づけも好きだった。これは、かなり手を使う仕事である。7)手の技を実践すること自体がその報いであることもある。この普遍的な価値は、趣味やスポーツ、その他のレジャー活動と同じくらいプロの芸術家の実践にも当てはまる。場合によっては、日常的な仕事にも当てはまり、仕事を遊びに変えるのである。

―* ―* ―* ―

1960年代前半に見られた多くの批評家たちの考えでは、アンデイ・ウオーホルやロイ・リクテンスタインらアメリカのポップアーテイストたちが商業美術のスタイルや技法を転用したのは、その機械的な再現性という特色を作品制作に応用するためだった。この新しい世代の芸術家たちは、ちょうど現代の芸術家が商業用デジタル技術のイメージを取り入れているように、商業用の再現技法を自分の作品に転用したが、そこには皮肉な意図があったように思われた。つまり、ロマン主義的な過去と結びついた高度に文化的な創造性からは距離を置こうとしているように見えたのである。ポップアーテイストたちにとっては、身近な過去とは抽象表現主義であり、デ・クーニングのような芸術家であった。

1963年の有名なインタヴユーで、ウオーホルは自らの行為の頑固なわがままぶりを強調した。ここに見られる大いなる皮肉(アイロニー)は、―-あるいはそれは皮肉ではないのかもしれないが―-ウオーホルは自分の芸術、そして自分の存在や魂さえも機械的であって欲しいと願っていたということだ。ウオーホルが言うには、「私がこのように描くのは、私が機械になりたいからだ。私が実践し、かつ機械的に実践することはすべて、私がやりたいことなのだと感じている。」ウオーホルが商業美術を専攻し、その方面でもキャリアがあったことを承知していた取材者は、そのような過去の経験を通じて画家の永遠の望みが引き出されたという可能性を考え、それならば商業美術の方が「さらに機械的」だろうかと尋ねているが、それに対してウオーホルは、「いいえ(さらに機械的ということはない)」と答えている。「お金をもらって仕事をしていたのだし、頼まれることは何でもした」と。ここでウオーホルが言っているのは、かなり複雑なことである。商業美術家としての彼は機械を操作することができたが、それを制御することはできなかった。従って、彼自身が、感覚的な意味において機械になる(あるいは、機械のように振る舞う)ことはできなかった。ウオーホルは、その機械を楽しむことも、それを使って遊ぶこともできず、本人風に言うならば、それを「好き」になることもできなかった。8)好きになるためには、彼は機械的なふりをして、自分が思うがまま、自由に機械的なプロセスを模倣しなくてはならなかった。

ロイ・リクテンスタインの場合、批評家たちが注目したのは、彼が漫画や商業広告のイメージを使うということだけではなく、その「点」を用いた技法であった。小さいが可変である点状の筆触を用いたスーラの点描画法とは異なり、リクテンスタインの技法は、同じ大きさの点を等間隔に配置していくというものだった。彼は、ステンシルを使い、手書きで写真製版の「ベンデイー・ドット」(網点)を模倣した。1970年のインタヴユーで、リクテンスタインは、この技法を、機械らしさのある部分の探求と結びつけ、「自分の絵がプログラム化されたものであるかのような印象を与えたい。自分の手の記録を隠してしまいたい」と表現した。これは正に一種の制御である。それを聞いて、取材者は、リクテンスタインが「なにもかも手を使って」やりたいのか、なぜそうしたいのかを訊ねた。リクテンスタインは答えた。「そうです。完全に制御したいのです。ただし、その制御が目に見えるものかどうかは問題ではありません。」9)リクテンスタインはここで、二種類の制御について語っているように見える。まず、自分の手の「記録」を制御するということ、つまり、目に見えるためらいの跡や作者特有の有機的なリズム、不規則なパターンなど、その画家個人を思わせるような要素、そしてコピーのメカニズムや厳密なデジタル・マッピングに抵触するような要素をすべて排除するという意味での制御である。次に、リクテンスタインは、話を問題のもう一つの側面に移している。彼は、機械技術の使用が結果を決定したと感じることなしに表現を成し遂げたいという意味で、「制御」したいというのだ。リキテンスタインは、プロジェクターを使用したが、そこでトレーシングしたのは、オリジナルを自分の手でスケッチしたものであって、印刷されたオリジナルそのものではなかった。また、トレーシングしている作業の途中で、即興で変更を加える余地が残されていた。トレーシンングは、規則的でなく不規則であり、その都度様々な選択が行われており、自動的なものは何もなかった。リクテンスイタインは、この自覚的な制御という要素に作品の鑑賞者が気付くかどうかは興味がないと主張していたので、この問題を批評家の関心を引くような、観念的な問題として示す必要は感じなかった。

リクテンスタインの言葉を文字通りに受け取るならば、彼は自分の手による作業が、制御の痕跡を残しても残さなくても、そのことは大して重要ではなかった。その点で、彼は、直前の世代の抽象表現主義者たちと趣を異にした。抽象表現主義の支持者たちにおいては、はっきりとした制御の痕跡を認めることができたが、それは境界の中に色彩をきちんと収めるような場を生む制御ではなかった。逆に、抽象表現主義者たちは、手が獲得した技能を抑制し、自然とわきあがる感情の放出を優先した。1948年にデ・クーニングが発表した白黒の抽象画について、アメリカの批評家、クレメント・グリーンバーグは、次のように賛辞を贈っている。

独特で独創的な表現を必要とするような感情は、本当に卓越した技能によって排除されることが多い。というのも、本当に卓越した技能には、特有の頑固さが伴い、安易な満足へと流れがちであるからだ。[デ・クーニングは制作にあたって]自らの技能を抑制しようとしている。ここでは、技術と感じられる類の意志が意図的に放棄されている。

これもまた、いささか複雑な考えである。グリーンバーグの主張では、デ・クーニングは、表現のために、手の技能の悦びや線を制御する自分の能力を抑えているのだという。しかし、その時、画家の意志が、再度、発揮されなければならない。そのようにして、彼は「(グリーンバーグが言うように)本当に自発的に制作をしている時と、単に機械的に作業を遂行している時の違いを知る」10)ことができるのである。

ロイ・リクテンスタインの「制御」は、このような評価を受けることはなかった。それは、目立たず、成果というよりは悦びとして、私的に経験されるようなものであった。それはまた、「真に自発的」なものと「機械的」なものとの間にもはっきりとした区別を設けたりはしなかった。後に、リクテンスタインは簡単に言った。「絵を描いている時は、本当に夢中になるのです」11)と。夢中になるということは、意識的な制御を必要とするわけでも、それを排除するわけでもない。むしろ、必要とされるのは、単純に、自覚的に注意を払うということ、つまり知性、身体、もしくはその両方による参与である。セザンヌが、リズミカルに作業し、「デジタルな」筆跡を残していた時、彼はその身体的なプロセスにあまりにも夢中になっていたので、かなり上の空であったのかもしれない。これと同じことが、スーラやリクテンスタインが点を描いている瞬間のいくつかについても当てはまるかもしれない。制御はしていたが、それをほとんど意識していなかったのである。

*     *    *     *     *    *     *     *    *     *

1960年代には、ポップアーテイストたちと、さらに若い、活動を始めたばかりの世代のアメリカの画家たち―-ここでは、チャック・クローズとヴィーヤ・セルミンズの二人を例として取り上げる―-は、直前の抽象表現主義者たちのように、絵画を表象から自由なものにしようと心を砕いてはいなかった。彼らは、媒体によってイメージのあり方が必然的に決定されるという事実を既に受け入れていたので、その自由もある程度までは当たり前のものと考えていた。彼等はむしろ、何かを描こうとしている時にそれを見て自分がどう感じるか、そして手を使って何かを制作するというのはどういうことなのか、という問題に注意を集中した。これらの画家たちは、描く対象として、写真を使った。写真からイメージをコピーするというプロセスを導入したことで、彼らは手の作業そのものに集中できた。写真の持つ決定的な特質によって、構図に関する選択は大きく排除された。というのも、写真の場合、16世紀初頭のグリッドを用いた装置によって対象が投影されたのと同じく、イメージがすでに平面に投影されているからである。以後、構図は、イメージ全体の割付ではなく、制作過程の細部、筆跡やデジタルなビットに存在するものとなった。

1998年に、チャック・クローズは、かつての自分自身を含む1960年代の芸術家たちの戦略について回想しながら、次のように話している。

過去の慣習や伝統から自由になる方法は、[中略]あるプロセスを見出し、それを遂行することだ。[中略]私は、どこをどう切り取っても同じように作られている絵を制作したかった。[中略]巧みな筆使いという意味では画家の手の痕跡が見られないが、信じられないような手仕事を要するような絵を。[中略]それは大変な労力を必要とする。12)

クローズが費やした労力は、リクテンスタインの場合と同様、制御を実践することを前提としていた。この制御という問題は、1991年に、クローズとその同時代の芸術家ヴィーヤ・セルミンズとの間に、後者の『銀河のドローイング』を巡って交わされた対話の中心的位置を占めている。1970年代初頭以来、セリミンズは写真をもとにしたこのような絵を制作している。クローズは言う。「宇宙全体の大きさのものを制御しようとしていますね。[中略](それと)同時に、8×10インチの小さな紙切れを制御しようとしている。」セルミンズの答えはこうだった。「私が興味あるのは、目の前にある空間を制御することだけです。」13)セルミンズが言っているのは、セザンヌの息子の肖像画と同じくらいの大きさの、その作品が占める真実の、物理的空間のことである。セルミンズは、自分の感情的および知的エネルギーをすべて、自分の手が残す痕跡に集中させることで満足している。セザンヌと違い、彼女はその痕跡と遠くにある自然の破片との関係については頭を悩ませることはしない。セルミンズが時折、まるで外部に具象的な対象など一切無いかのように、自分の作品が抽象的であると主張する理由はここにある。セルミンズの作品のもとになっているのは、写真とセルミンズ独自の痕跡の残し方であり、どちらもすでに抽象的なのである。

チャック・クローズとの対話のさらに後の方で、セルミンズは言っている。「これら(『銀河のドローイング』)が星空の下で生まれたと思われるかもしれませんが、私にとってそれは、鉛筆の黒い色に対する愛情から生まれたのです。まるで、鉛筆の黒さが持つイメージとともに、その黒さそのものを探求しているかのようでした。」14)ここでは、セルミンズが、残された痕跡の物質に関心を抱いているため、通常の絵画的ヒエラルキーが逆転する。つまり、宇宙の黒さが星の明るさに対して支配的になるのである。黒さというのは、光と同じくらい画家にとっては現実的なものである。それは、ただ単に光の不在を表しているのではなく、鉛筆もしくは絵の具の非常に物質的な痕跡の存在、黒い色を何重にも塗る画家の手の関与をも表す。セルミンズは、その媒体の黒さを濃密で、物理的な形で経験している。その最終的な結果として生じる絵が、機械的に生成された写真によく似ているにもかかわらずである。

1969年に描かれたフィリップ・グラスの肖像画に見られるようなチャック・クローズの初期のエアブラシ技法は、セルミンズによる色の微妙な重ね合いによく似ている。クローズの場合も、一種の大変物質的かつデジタルな体験を表している。写真の粒子と同様、クローズが残した個々の痕跡は、それだけではほとんど何も語りはしない。デ・クーニングの筆跡のように、ましてやセザンヌの筆跡のように、大げさな表現を駆使することはない。我々がそれに注目するのは、それが全体のイメージに「干渉」する時のみである。このような干渉は、我々が作品に近づきすぎたときにのみ生じる。我々は手作りの平面を見ると、それがいかにして人間の手で作られたのか興味を抱くので、つい近づかずにはいられない。時には、スーラの作品を見た者と同じように、我々は一種の競争心から、自分にも同じようなことができるのではなかろうか、と考えてみることがある。グリッドを用い、絵の具を非物質化された仕方で塗っていくクローズの戦略は、感覚的刺激の量を減らしすべてのデイテールを均等に見せることによって、クローズ自身の言葉で言う「どこをどう切り取っても同じように作られている」15)絵を目指すものだった。これは、目立つ部分がその他の部分を見えにくくするのを阻止することによって、結果としてより多くのものを見せることであった。クローズは、鼻や目と同じくらい頬を強調したかった。彼は、現在の我々がコンピュータによるスキャンで見慣れているようなデジタルな均質性を求めた。クローズの作品を見ると、我々は思っていたよりもずっと多くのデイテールに気付くという体験を繰り返す。それも、これらの作品がしばしば非常に大きなものとして制作されるからだけではない。クローズの最新(1990年代以降)の絵は、非常に徹底している。ここでは、一種の平板な光のみからなる「何もない」背景が、暖色と寒色が入れ替わりながら織りなす遊びという、静的なバリエーションによって活気づく。画家は(そして鑑賞者も)このように均質ではあるが、同時に賑やかな背景に歓喜する。情報をほとんど伝達しないこれらの背景は、純粋に感覚的な働きかけの場である。またその働きかけは、画家が制御として、あるいは悦びとして経験しているものと一致するのである。

–* — * – * — *–

1953年に、「切り絵」技法に取り組んでいた83歳のアンリ・マテイスは、芸術家は「子どもの頃と同じ目で人生を見なければならない」16)と言った。これは、珍しくない考えであり、19世紀のロマン主義や20世紀のモダニストたちも何度となく繰り返し主張しているが、ウオーホル、リキクテンスタイン、クローズ、セルミンズのような芸術家たちはこれを主張しない。我々がこの考えをもはや信じていないとしても、それでもそこには何か学ぶべきものがあるだろうか。

マテイスが子供に言及するのは、よくある二つの文化的構成の対立と関係付けることができる。ひとつは、生産性に置かれる価値であり、ここでの生産物とは自然の模倣で、有効な技術的手順の結果、つまりセザンヌが達成しようと苦心していたものの価値である。もうひとつは、人生の物質的および身体的な悦び、場合によっては精神的な悦びにさえ、置かれる価値である。20世紀の観察者たちは、これをマテイス、そして子どもの感覚的な無垢状態と結びつけてきたが、苦悩に満ちたセザンヌとは結びつけなかった。しかし、この二人の画家には、仕事の仕方に関して、大きな類似点がいくつもある。事実、マテイスは、セザンヌの絵を一枚購入し、長年に渡って、称賛しながら、眺め暮らした。

生産性と悦びとの間の対立については、その関心の一端は周りの文化的論争に関するものであり、残りの一端はおそらく芸術家がまさに制作に取り組んでいるその瞬間に起こりがちなものだということを、マテイスは理解していた。マテイスによれば、芸術家は「自分が見たものだけを描いていると信じられる純真さを持ち合わせているべきだ。」しかし、同時に芸術家は、「考えると、その作品が作り物であることに気付くべきだが、制作している途中は、彼は[単に]自然を模倣したと感じているべきだ。」17)ここでマテイスが示唆しているのは、セザンヌを悩ませた類の不安、つまり作品が自然のデジタルな対応物の域に達していないという苦悩は、描くというその行為の外でのみ生じるということである。それに対して、制作過程においては、すべて、調和がとれて満足のいくものとして映る。芸術家は、自分の作品―-セルミンズが言う「目の前にある空間」―-だけではなく、外の世界とも繋がっているように感じる。マテイスの主張では、芸術の悦びの一部は、表象の幻想を楽しむこと、絵画のプロセスに没頭することで適切な表象、真実のコピーを作り出すことができるという信念のもとに行動することにあるというのだ。これが画家の悦びとなるのだが、リクテンスタインやクローズならこの悦びを分かち合えるだろう。画家のアトリエという孤立した世界においては、イメージが本物と合致し、画家の望む通りのものになるのである。にもかかわらず、その後に必然的にやってくる自己批判の瞬間に、芸術家は、自分の表象が1ビットごと、デジタルに作られた作り物であり、そのアナログの対象の限られた部分しか捉えることができていないことを、認めるのである。

1946年にクレメント・グリーンバーグが主張したところによると、マテイスその他のヨーロッパの巨匠たちは、最初にひとつのことをしたかと思うと次に別のことをしたという。最初は純粋に自分たちの直感的な表現を追い求め、それからまるでそれが自分たちの技術的な成功や批判的な自意識によって崩壊してしまったかのように、利益追求のために自分たちの技巧を繰り返すようになった。グリーンバーグの言葉はこうである。「パリ派は、もはや悦びを発見しようとするのではなく、それを提供しようとしていた。[中略]1920年以前の(マテイスの)傑作において、我々を感動させた感情は、技巧に取って代わられている」18)

グリーンバーグの論理でいうと、このような感情から技巧への転換は、芸術から遊びを取り除いてしまい、生産者(制作者)にとっても消費者(鑑賞者)にとっても健全な利益を排除してしまった。19)換言すれば、マテイスは、自身がなりたいと願っていた子どもであることをやめ、その子どもを表象するにすぎないものになってしまった。そして、それは、あらゆる表象が持つ不幸な欠陥を持つ表象だった。さらにウオーホルにまで考えを進めると、この表象することと、そうであることとの差は、機械のようなスタイルで制作することと、実際に自分を機械として経験することとの違いに類似している。また、セザンヌの場合に話を戻せば、それは絵の具が自然に対応しなかった時のデジタルな挫折と、リズミカルに絵の具を塗っていくことで、手においても身体においても、自分が自然そのもののように感じられることがあるデジタルな悦び、との違いである。

グリーンバーグが言うように、マテイスは、本当に子供らしい物の見方を維持できなかったのだろうか。この疑問に答えることで、各人が、遊び、仕事、悦び、そして生産性といった文化的構成を個人的にどう内面化しているかということが明らかになるだろう。現在、ありふれた真実(少なくとも批評の原理のひとつ)になりつつあるのは、我々が自分たち個人の財産や、さらには思想を制御する以上に、技術や技術主義的な政治経済学が我々を制御している、という考えである。我々は時折、自分たちが、手を持ち、ものに触れることのできる人間というよりも、非物質化された計算器のように機能しているのではないかと不安になる。ものに触れるというのは、感情を生む行為である。もし本当に我々が計算器のようになっているなら、絵画や手を使ったあらゆる芸術は、制御が身体全体の悦びにつながる活動として、並外れた社会的重要性を帯びるかもしれない。デジタルな体験、画家の制作プロセスとの関わりは―-そのスタイルが制御されているか自発的であるか、あるいは機械的か表現が豊かかに関わらず―-このデジタル体験は、我々にとって、重要な思想的、また倫理的意義を持つことになるだろう。画家の活動は、技術社会における生活の模範、もしくは指針であり続けるだろう。しかし、それは、新たな世代が、その都度、再検証しなければならないモデルである。

 

Références   [ + ]

1.Richard Shiff, L’expérience digitale – Une problématique de la peinture moderne, dans Les Cahiers,Nr. 66, Hiver 1998, pp. 51-77.
2.Henri Focillon, Éloge de la main, dans Vie des formes,1943, Paris, 8eédition, Presses Universitaires de France, p. 110.
3.Henri Focillon, ibid.,p. 115.
4.Pierre Francastel, Art et technique aux XIXe et XX siècle – La genèse des formes modernes, Paris, Éditions Denoël, 1956
5.Etienne Souriau, L’Art et la machine, dans Clefs pour l’Esthetique,Éditions Seghers, Paris, 1970, pp. 152-167.
6.Reyner Banham, Theory and Design in the First Machine Age,London, 1960.
7.For a useful perspective on media art, please refer to Yoshizumi Takeshi’s Media Jidai no Geijutu: Geijutu to Nichijo no Hazama (Art in the Media Age: Between Art and Daily Life), Keiso Publishing, 1992 (in Japanese).
8.Rosalind E. Krauss, The Originality of the Avant-Garde, The Originality of the Avant-Garde and other Modernist Myths,The MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., 1985, pp. 151-170.
9.Richard Shiff, Originality, in Critical Terms for Art History,The University of Chicago Press, 1996, pp. 103-115.
10.Meyer Schapiro, New Light on Seurat, in Art News,LVII, April, 1958, pp. 23-24, 44-45, 52.
11.Marshall McLuhan, Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man,The MIT Press, Cambridge, Mass., London, 1964, pp. 338-345.
12.Richard Shiff, La touche de Cézanne: entre vision impressionniste et vision symboliste, Cézanne aujourd’hui (Actes de colloque organisé par le musée d’Orsay, 29 et 30 novembre 1995), Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris, 1997, p. 124. (I would like to express my gratitude to Shiff for providing me with the English text I have quoted here.)
13.Philippe Junod, Transparence et Opaciée – Essai sur les fondements théorique del’art moderne pour une nouvelle lecture de Konrad Fiedler,Éditions L’Âge d’homme, Lausanne, 1975.
14.Hubert Damisch, Les dessous de la peinture, Fenêtre jaune cadmium ou les dessous de la peinture, Paris,Éditionsdu Seuil, 1984, pp. 11-46; Henri Focillon, Manuels d’histoire de l’art. La peinture aux XIXe et XX siècles du Réalisme à nos jours,Paris Librairie Renouard-H. Laurens, Éditeur, 1928; T. Nagaï, Matiérisme/Modernité— Le phénomène de symbiose des techniques du dessin et de la peinture au XIXe siècle, in AestheticNr. 177, 1994 Summer, pp. 42-52 (text in Japanese), p. 79 (summary in French).
15.Richard Shiff, Cézanne’s Physicality: The Politics of Touch, in The Language of Art History, edited by Salim Kemal and Ivan Gaskell, Cambridge University Press, 1991, pp. 129-180.
16.Marshall McLuhan, The Gutenberg Galaxy: The Making of Typographic Man,University of Toronto Press, 1962. Understanding Media: The Extensions of Man,The Mit Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, London, 1964, pp. 308-337. In this work, McLuhan pointed out that in the pictures of Cézanne, Seurat and Georges-Henri Rouault, which dismantle representational painting as products of the scientific laws of perspective giving priority to the visual, and consist of small units of paint on the canvas, there exists a mosaic-like construction, which acts as the basis for television and emphasizing the sense of touch. But in fact there is nothing that links the invention of television to the work of the three, and McLuhan did not make any mention about the differences in each of the painters’ brush-work. To explore the topic further, a more thorough study is needed.
17.Albert Boime, The Academy & French Painting in the 19th CenturyNew Haven and London, 1971.
18.Bruno Foucart, Les Salons et l’innovation picturale au XIXe siècle, dans le Catalogue d’exposition. La tradition et l’innovation dans l’art francais par les peintres des salons,1989, The National Museum of Modern Art Kyoto, pp. 15-18.
19.Jean-Claude Lebensztejn, Deuxième puissance, CritiqueNr. 454, 1985, pp. 225-248.
20.Lettre à un jeune artiste (ami de Joachim Gasquet) (Gustave Heiries?), dans Cézanne – Correspondance,éditée par John Rewald, Nouvelle édition complète et définitive, Paris, Bernard Grasset, 1978, p. 256.
21.Meyer Schapiro, The Nature of Abstract Art, Marxist QuarterlyJanuary-March, 1937, pp. 77-98 ; Impressionism-Reflections and PerceptionsGeorge Braziller, New York, 1997; T. J. Clark, The Painting of Modern Life Parisien Art of Manet and His FollowersLondon, 1984; Robert Herbert, Impressionism Art, Leisure, and Parisien SocietyNew Haven and London, 1988; Robert Herbert L. and Eugenia W. Herbert, Artists and Anarchism: Unpublished Letters of Pissarro, Signac and others-I, II, Burlington MagazineVol. CII, Nr. 692, 693, November, December, 1960, pp. 473-481, pp. 517-522; Françoise Cachin, The Néo-Impressionist Avant-Garde, in Art News annualNo. 4, 1968, pp. 55-66, etc.
22.See Note 4.
23.Richard Shiff, Sensation, Movement, Cezanne, Classic Cézanne (exhibition catalogue), The Art Gallery of New South Wales, 1998, p. 22; Mark, Motif, Materiality — The Cézanne Effect in the Twentieth Century, in Finished Unfinished Cézanne (exhibition catalogue), Kunstforum Wien, 2000, pp. 106-107, 117-120; Introduction to Conversation with Cézanne, edited by Michael Doran, University of California Press, Berkeley/Los Angeles/London, 2001, pp. xxxi-xxxiv.
24.Eugène Delacroix, Journal 1822-1863, Préface de Hubert Damisch, Introduction et notes par André Joubin, Éditions Plon, Paris, 1982 (Mardi 8 Octobre 1922), p. 29.
25.See the researches by Meyer Schapiro, Theodore Reff, Geist and others, as mentioned in the Isabelle Cahn’s bibliography in Cézanne (Catalogue d’exposition)Galeries nationales du Grand Palais, 1996 ; Réunion des Musées Nationaux, Paris, 1996, pp. 581-587.
26.Rosalind Krauss, Poststructuralism and the Paraliterary, in op. cit.pp. 291-296.