R900 – La Montagne Sainte-Victoire au-dessus de la route du Tholonet (avec pin parasol), vers 1904 (FWN350)

Pavel Machotka

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La Montagne Sainte-Victoire au-dessus de la route du Tholonet (avec pin parasol), vers 1904 73.2 x 92.1 cm R900 FWN350

La Montagne Sainte-Victoire au-dessus de la route du Tholonet (avec pin parasol), vers 1904
73.2 x 92.1 cm
R900 FWN350

The magnificent La Montagne Sainte-Victoire au-dessus de la route du Tholonet (avec pin parasol) achieves a very happy integration, all the more difficult to do because the painter must contend with the challenge of greater contrasts, more saturated colors, and a deeper space. The colors must take into account the intense red patch of bare earth in the lower left corner and some reds visible at the base of the mountain and integrate the with the greens and blues. Balance is achieved easily by letting the greens of the pines remain unusually dull, but integration—for Cézanne—requires the colors to interpenetrate rather than standing apart. He brings the reds into the face of the mountain, in places where they are just suggested by the slight variations the naked eye can see, but with a more intense pigmentation; and he introduces them here and there into the vegetation. No single color remains unmixed with at least one of the other two, and yet—such is Cézanne’s fine calculation—we see the earth as red and the vegetation as green, while sensing a world that is interconnected and whole at the same time. In the letter to his son of August 14, 1906 he said, “it is all a matter of putting in as many relationships as possible”. He was referring to watercolor he was working on, but he might have been describing any deeply cohesive painting such as this one.

Source: Machotka, Landscape into Art (photographs on the site on p. 192.)

Quelques photos du site :

Photographie Ely vers 1900

Photographie Ely vers 1900

Photographie non identifiée

Photographie non identifiée

Photographie John Rewald 1935

Photographie John Rewald 1935

Photographie Pavel Machotka